The Why Behind Color Eyewear Lenses

While we love colored eyewear lenses as an opportunity to make a bold fashion statement, that’s not all they can do. A different lens color for your eyewear or sunglasses can help filter light differently to fit your unique needs best. Unsure if you could benefit from a pair of colored lenses, read below!

Whether you need to enhance the colors you see, make your colors more vivid, reduce glare, or improve visual acuity, there is a colored lens for you!

Choosing Your Lens Color

Green

Green eyewear lenses create contrast in your vision by filtering out a larger percentage of blue light. This color lens reduces glare and allows you to see more comfortably on bright sunny days. If you are a golfer or tennis player, a pair of green lenses may be a great addition to your game!

Gray

Gray lenses are one of the most common for a standard pair of sunwear. This color reduces the glare of light when reflecting off of surfaces like water or pavement. In addition to cutting glare, gray lenses easily shield bright light, making them an excellent option for sunny or cloudy days. While gray lenses are a perfect everyday lens for most people, the glare reduction is the ideal addition to individuals who spend time on the water.

Blue or purple

Blue tinted lenses improve color perception and increase your ability to see object contours. This color of lenses also increases visibility by reducing glare on snowy surfaces or in foggy/misty environments. Our favorite part? Blue lenses look great at almost any skin tone keeping you looking and seeing your best!

Red or rose

Rose-colored lenses are the perfect pair of lenses for many sports activities like skiing and cycling. Red or rose-colored sunglasses block blue light, helping to reduce eye strain. They also increase your vision’s depth of field and provide enhanced detail.

Yellow, orange, or gold

While yellow, orange, or gold lenses may distort your vision’s color, they are an excellent solution for indoor sports with lower lighting conditions. By providing improved visibility of objects, this color lens makes your surroundings seem brighter. This color lens also provides increased depth perception.

Amber or brown

Like rose and orange-colored lenses, amber or brown lenses reduce glare and help brighten surroundings when in lower light conditions. Activities like golf and baseball that need improved depth perception across the green or blue landscape will benefit from this color lens.

Ready to try out a new pair of colored lenses? Before purchasing sunglasses with colored lenses, stop by the office, and we can help evaluate which lens color will be the best fit for you. Or during your next appointment, ask us about sport-specific eyewear. Some frames allow you to change your lens based on your activity!

6 Common Eye Symptoms and What to Do

Suffering from eye discomfort or blurry vision can be scary, especially if it comes on suddenly or is a result of a dramatic event. Below are some of the common eye-related disorders. However, remember that common doesn’t mean it should be ignored. If you are experiencing any of these systems or if you have questions about your eye health, call us to schedule an appointment with one of our caring eye care professionals.

Symptom One: Red Eyes

Many things can cause red or bloodshot eyes, including allergies, pink eye, or eye trauma. Our eye care professionals can help determine the cause of your redness and develop a treatment plan for you! Be sure to mention your red-eye symptoms when scheduling your appointment!

Symptom Two: Itchy Eyes

Itchy eyes are one of the most common eye symptoms that people experience. Again, there are many potential causes that could lead to itchy eyes, including allergies, contact lens usage, and prolonged use of digital devices. Even though it may provide temporary relief, you should never rub your eyes as it can add allergens or bacteria into your eye, compounding the issue.

Symptom Three: Puffy Eyes

Swelling around the eyes is due to excessive fluids in the skin tissue, but there are a variety of reasons for that extra fluid to be present. Allergies, Dehydration, overconsumption of salt, lack of sleep, stress, and crying can all lead to eyes appearing puffy.

Symptom Four: Burning Sensation in Eyes

If certain products, makeup, facial cleaners, or shampoo, come in contact with our eyes, we may experience a burning sensation in our eyes. If the burning sensation is a continued problem, identify your surroundings and the products you are using and try to reduce your exposure. If reducing your exposure isn’t an option, or if you are still suffering, call our office to schedule an appointment.

Symptom Five: Spots in Vision

Although this sounds scary, it isn’t necessarily a reason to worry. Spots or floaters are caused by protein and tissue in the gel-like matter in your eyes, and it is normal to occasionally see spots in your vision. This will even become increasingly common with age. If you are experiencing more spots or floaters than normal, call our practice to schedule an appointment, and be sure to mention your vision changes!

Symptom Six: Painful Eyes

Call our office immediately if you have a foreign body enter your eye or if you are experiencing prolonged eye pain. While waiting for your appointment, remain calm, avoid rubbing your eye, and do not try to remove the object yourself. When speaking with our team, we may ask you to describe your symptoms in detail to help us pinpoint the cause.

Our team of trained professionals is here to answer all of your eye-related questions! Schedule an appointment with us today, even if your eye health feels like it is in perfect condition!

Cataracts: Cause, Symptoms, and Treatment

Cataracts affect about 24 million Americans and are the leading cause of blindness in the world.* Cataracts are a natural part of aging but should be addressed as they start to affect your vision. If you are over the age of 40, we recommend scheduling a yearly comprehensive eye exam to detect cataracts as they develop. Want to learn more about the cause, symptoms, and treatment of cataracts? Read below!

What causes cataracts?

Cataracts are the clumping together of proteins within the lens of your eye, causing cloudiness in your vision. While health issues like diabetes, obesity, smoking, ultraviolet radiation, and family history can influence your development of cataracts, your eyes and body’s natural aging also leads to cataracts. As you age, cataracts may begin to develop and get larger or more severe over time naturally.

Symptoms

Symptoms vary from person to person. If you start to experience any of the following symptoms associated with cataracts, schedule an appointment with our office.

  • Slight blur in vision
  • Dim or cloudy vision
  • Light sensitivity (sunlight or lamps seem too bright)
  • Colors appear faded
  • Reduced night vision quality

Types of cataracts

Subcapsular

Subcapsular cataracts, most commonly found in individuals with diabetes, typically occur in the back of the lens. Because of where it develops, you may notice symptoms of degraded night vision or difficulty reading first.

Nuclear

Nuclear cataracts are the most common and are associated with aging and occur in the central zone of the lens.

Cortical

Cortical cataracts are the opposite of Nuclear cataracts and begin in the outer part of the lens, interfering with light passage through the eye.

Are cataracts preventable?

Lower your risk of developing cataracts by maintaining your body and eye health.

  • Schedule a yearly comprehensive eye exam! 
  • Stop smoking!  Smoking can increase your risk of cataracts.
  • Continuing treatment if you have diabetes or other medical conditions will help minimize your risk.
  • Prevent ultraviolet radiation by wearing 100% UV blocking sunglasses.

Treating cataracts

If you are experiencing symptoms listed above or are concerned you may be developing cataracts, call our office to schedule an appointment. During your appointment, we will examine your eyes and provide the best recommendation to manage your cataracts or recommend surgery if needed. Cataract surgery involves removing the cloudy lens and replacing it with a clear lens to improve your vision.

Have more specific questions about cataracts, your risk, or treatment options? Call our office to schedule an appointment and let us know you would like to learn more about cataracts!

*National Eye Institute (https://nei.nih.gov)

A Must-Have: Children’s Sunglasses

In the same way we protect our skin from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays, we need to protect our eyes as well! Even more importantly, we need to protect our child’s eyes. Children’s eyes are still developing at a young age, and with the substantial time they spend outdoors, it is essential to purchase sunglasses to protect their eyes from harmful UV rays. Kid’s sunglasses are designed to appeal to their style to promote better use!

UV Rays: What are they?

UV rays or ultraviolet radiation is a form of electromagnetic radiation or energy. UV rays are emitted from the sun as well as sources like tanning beds. Our inability to see these rays is what makes them so dangerous. Ultraviolet rays fall outside the range of visible light for the human eye.

Harmful UV Ray Exposure

Eye Development

The lens inside a child’s eye is still developing and cannot filter high energy rays similar to adults’ eye lenses. This inability to filter and fully protect their eyes causes children to have a higher risk of UV rays damage. Shielding your infant’s or child’s eyes from UV rays as early as possible will help prevent overexposure to UV radiation throughout their lifetime. For younger children and infants, a sun hat provides additional protection to their skin and eyes throughout the day as the sun shifts, and in case they remove their sunglasses.

Environment

Exposure to UV radiation increases at high altitudes, tropical locations, and in reflective environments. Consider the level of risk in your environment and if you should wear protective eyewear. Here are a few environmental aspects and how they could affect your exposure to harmful UV rays.

  • Altitude: At higher altitudes, the earth’s atmosphere is thinner and unable to provide the same protection from UV rays.
  • Location: As you move closer to the earth’s equator, the level of UV rays increases. If you and your family visit a tropical area near the earth’s equator, always wear 100% UV blocking eyewear when outdoors.
  • Highly reflective services: Areas with highly reflective services like pools, lakes, oceans, and snow reflect UV rays. Snow can reflect up to 80% of UV rays creating a higher risk of UV damage to your eyes.
  • Clouds: Keep in mind clouds do not block UV radiation. UV exposure can be high on cloudy days.

Time of Day

  • Time of day: UV levels are higher between 10 am to 2 pm when the sun is at its peak.
  • Setting: Highly reflective surfaces like sand, snow, and water provide a much higher risk of eye damage due to UV radiation.

Kids Sunglasses

We understand convincing your child to wear sunglasses can be a challenge. Use these pointers when talking with your kids about sunglasses! Don’t forget, you know your children better than anyone else, so some of these tips may not work for them.

  • Match the current trends. If your child loves a specific color, pattern, or shape, purchase sunglasses to match their unique style.
  • Make sure the eyewear fits properly. If the fit is wrong, your child may feel discomfort while wearing their glasses. Have your optician make sure that your child is comfortable wearing their glasses and make adjustments if they need to.
  • TV shows, young celebrities, and brands like Disney create sunglass lines to appeal specifically to children. That’s right; children notice and prefer brand named items just like teens and adults.
  • Keep frame in the family. If the child has an adult or sibling, they look up to and admire, purchase your child similar sunglasses to what the adult or sibling owns. This will appeal to the child’s desire to look more like their older sibling or parent!
  • Let them do the shopping. Take children shopping specifically to pick out their very own unique pair of sunglasses. The more they like their sunglasses, the more likely they are to wear them, and the better protected their eyes will be from harmful UV radiation from the sun.

5 Reasons You Need Another Pair of Eyewear

From playing with the kids to working on the computer and playing golf with friends, our lives take us many different directions every day. However, is your eyewear ready for your multiple hobbies and the activities in between? Our busy lives show us that having multiple pairs of eyewear handy is a necessity. Here are a few reasons why we recommend having another pair of eyewear at the ready!

1) Accidents Happen

We’ve all been there! Looking for your missing glasses when you need them most or hearing a crunch when sitting on the couch for a relaxing movie night? An additional pair of eyewear can’t guarantee your current eyewear will be safe,  but it will significantly reduce the chances of having to go without. Contact lens wearer? Backup glasses are the perfect solution for a lost contact lens without a replacement. An additional pair of eyewear can hold you over until your new contact lenses come in!

2) Screen Time

Your eyes are exposed to harmful blue light through all digital devices, including your phone, TV, and tablet. This increased exposure to screens and blue light can cause eye strain and fatigue. If you are suffering from fatigue or headaches, computer eyewear is the perfect addition to your eyewear collection. Try wearing a pair of blue light blocking eyewear during extended screen use to alleviate your symptoms.

3) Work & Sports

From safety-approved eyewear for your workday to a pair of colored lenses to improve your game in the evening, we have you covered! No matter what space your lifestyle puts you in, get a pair of eyewear that fits each need. For example, a pair of polarized lenses may be a great addition to your eyewear lineup if you work outdoors at a construction site or love spending your weekends fishing. Polarized lenses remove glare off water or cement so you can see your best throughout your day.  If you are an avid golfer, try a pair of eyewear with colored lenses to increase contrast on the green and see your game soar!

4) Contact Lens Wearers

Protecting your eyes from harmful UV rays every season is key to reducing your risk for other eye-related diseases. However, not all contact lenses protect your eyes from the harmful UV rays of the sun. That is why we say a pair of plano sunwear that blocks 100% of UV rays is a must-have for all contact lens users.

5) Style

Eyewear is more than just a medical necessity. It’s a fashion accessory! A date night with your partner calls for a different pair of eyewear than when working at your computer throughout the day. Try a pair of funky frames to showcase your personality and grab a more neutral pair for professional situations.

Ready to shop for your second pair of eyewear? We are excited to help! Schedule an appointment today, and we will help you find the best frames and lenses for your lifestyle!

Floaters or Spots: Should I be worried?

Have you noticed tiny shadows cast upon objects? Small spots, lines, or other shapes caused by floaters in your eye aren’t a big deal most of the time. Read more below to find out when you should contact your doctor about spots in your vision!

Floaters or Spots, are they normal?

As you age, the gel-like consistency in your eye begins to dissolve, creating floaters in the watery center of your eye. While you cannot see the particle floating in your eye, a shadow of these particles reflects off the objects. Floaters or spots are normal, and typically, treatment is not necessary.

Flashes of light

When light enters your eye, it sends a message to the retina. The retina then produces an electrical impulse to your brain. The brain then interprets this impulse as an image.

If the retina is tugged or torn, it’s common to see flickers of light. Depending on the retinal tissue’s severity, the flashes or flickers of light can be temporary or continue indefinitely. If you see flashes or flickering light in your vision, call our office immediately!

Shower of floaters

Seeing a few new floaters is not an emergency. However, if you suddenly see a shower of floaters or spots, this may cause concern. The sudden appearance of flashes of light could mean that damage is occurring to your retina. If any of these symptoms suddenly appear, call our office immediately to discuss them with your eye doctor.

Dark shadows in peripheral vision

If your floaters or spots become darkened peripheral vision or larger areas start to darken and stay in your peripheral vision, call our office to schedule an appointment immediately. Loss of sight in your peripheral vision could be the sign of a more severe vision problem.

It is our goal to keep your eyes healthy throughout your life. If you notice trouble seeing or are experiencing pain with your vision, schedule an appointment. While you can’t prevent some eye diseases, there are some general tips to protect your vision and maintain eye health.

  • Receive a comprehensive eye exam
  • Maintain a healthy diet
  • Drink more water
  • Wear protective eyewear
  • Rest your eyes

Protecting Your Eyes in Every Season

There are many things we need to protect our eyes from all year round, including allergies, dry eye, and harmful UV rays. Each of these could affect your eyes any day of the year.  Take a look at these tips for protecting your eyes so you can stay allergy-free, hydrated, and protected  from harmful UV rays.

Reducing Allergy Symptoms

Whether you have seasonal, perennial, or indoor allergies, the key to protecting yourself is to reduce your exposure to allergens. From summer to winter, here are some tips to reduce your symptoms.

  • Wear Sunglasses. Try wearing sunglasses outside to protect yourself from harmful UV rays and keep pollen or allergens from entering your eyes.
  • Keep your hands and face clean. Your hands touch many surfaces throughout the day and can easily pick up allergens from your surroundings. Reduce the possibility of allergens entering your eye by making sure your hands are clean before touching your face and eyes.
  • Opt for glasses. Contact lenses are an excellent option for most people, but if you are heavily affected by outdoor allergens, opting for glasses instead might reduce allergy symptoms. Glasses allow your eyes to maintain lubrication and act as a shield from outdoor allergens.
  • Keep your windows shut and use your air conditioning instead!
  • Use an air purifier to remove your allergy triggers from your indoor space.
  • Keep your eyes lubricated by using artificial tears and rewetting drops.

Protecting Your Eyes From Against Harmful UV

Your exposure to harmful UV rays is affected by many different factors from location, time of day, cloud cover to your environment. However, these factors don’t mean that UV protection is not needed. Check out our facts below about UV rays and different environments.

  • Clouds: While clouds do block some light and UV rays, UVA can penetrate clouds and reach your eyes.
  • Sun: Easy, sun = UV radiation. Always make sure you are wearing your sunglasses on a sunny day!
  • Snow: On sunny days, snow can reflect up to 90% of UV radiation. Wear a pair of sunwear on snowy days to protect your eyes and reduce blinding glare from reflected light.
  • Water: Water can reflect up to 10% of UV light and sand by almost 15%. So next time you head out to go fishing or to the beach, remember your UV protective eyewear!

Reduce Your Dry Eye Symptoms

Does chronic dry eye syndrome or extended computer use have your eyes tired, red, and itchy? Try these tips to reduce your dry eye symptoms and find relief!

  • Weather: If you are going out on a cold or windy day, pack your glasses or sunwear! Heavy wind can cause your eyes to dry out. By wearing a pair of eyewear, you are keeping your eyes hydrated.
  • Take a computer break. Our bodies naturally blink less when working on a digital device. Remember to take breaks from your computer screen to give your eyes a break!
  • Remember to blink! Try adding a note to your computer screen to remind yourself to blink! Blinking is what keeps your eyes hydrated and can help alleviate dry eye symptoms.
  • Keep your eyes lubricated by using artificial tears and rewetting drops.

Ready to start protecting your eyes all year round! Grab a pair of eyewear during your next appointment or ask us about relief from your symptoms. We are here to help.

5 Myths About Contact Lenses You Shouldn’t Believe

Thinking about giving contact lenses a try but nervous they might not be right for you? Although the only guaranteed way to have a positive experience with contact lenses is to schedule an appointment with one of our eye care professionals, we want to address some of the common myths we hear about wearing contact lenses.

Myth One: I’m too old to wear contact lenses.

Some people believe once they reach a certain age, contact lenses are no longer appropriate or possible. If you develop the need for a corrective perception later in life and worry contact lenses will not work, talk to our team! We can explore your options for making contact lenses fit into your prescriptive needs and your lifestyle.

Myth Two: My child is too young to wear contact lenses.

On the flip side, most parents are cautious about their children wearing contact lenses. There are no age restrictions on wearing contacts. However, we like to ensure your child is responsible and mature enough to manage the application, removal, and care of contact lenses. If your child has expressed interest in contact lenses, our staff can advise whether they would be a suitable fit.

Myth Three: Contact lenses will get lost behind my eye.

We hear this one a lot, and we are here to confirm that this is physically impossible. Although contact lenses can shift in your eyes, there is a membrane that covers your eye which connects inside your eyelid that prevents anything from getting behind your eye. So even if your contact shifts slightly, never panic. It can be easily adjusted.

Myth Four: Contact lenses can get stuck to the eye.

This is another popular misconception. However, we believe it originates from improper wear, care, and removal, and not because contact lenses are a bad solution for individuals. In most situations where a contact feels stuck, your eye may simply be dry. Applying some rewetting drops should loosen them up and make them easy to remove.

Myth Five: I’ll never be able to put in contact lenses.

Placing contact lenses directly on your eye can be scary, especially the first few times, but our team is here to help! Our trained professionals will coach you through the process and ensure you are confident in your abilities to put in and take out your contact lenses before leaving the office.

We hope by debunking some of these common myths, your eyes are open to the idea of wearing contact lenses. Don’t let fear ruin your chances of living happily with contact lenses. Schedule an appointment with our team to talk about your specific needs, and we can explore your options together!

Your Eyes In The Digital World

It’s no secret we live in a very digital world and use digital devices throughout the day. While we cannot escape exposure to digital devices and blue light, it is important to know how our eyes are affected by our changing technological environment.

Before we talk more about the digital world and its effect on our eyes, let us share our top tip to keep your eyes comfortable during extended periods of device usage. Follow the 20/20/20 rule! Every 20 mins of device usage, take a 20-second break and look at something at least 20 feet away. This simple exercise will help you keep your eyes lubricated and reduce any eye strain you may be experiencing.

Digital Devices & Blue Light

Blue light is a high energy spectrum of light emitted by the sun and human-made sources like your computer or a phone’s digital screen. This light can reach deeper into the eye and cause eye strain.

Since the sun is the biggest emitter of blue light, it has been tied to our circadian rhythm. Higher exposure to blue light tells our body it’s daytime and that we should be awake, while lower amounts in the evening tell our body it’s time to rest. By supplementing the sun’s natural blue light with digital devices, we are tricking our bodies into a different pattern of awake and rest.

Are digital devices harmful to my eyes?

With all light, if your eye has been overexposed, there are risks to your vision health. In this case, blue light can reach the back of your eye. When overexposed to this type of light without protection, it can increase your risk for specific eye-related diseases. To keep your eyes protected, we recommend ay pair of computer eyewear or blue light blocking lenses.

Reduce Your Risk

To reduce your risk of digital eye strain and other eye-related diseases, we recommend the following for adults and children who spend time on a screen light-emitting device.

  • Practice the 20/20/20 rule.
  • Remember to blink!
  • Use eye rewetting drops.
  • Reduce or limit your screen time.
  • Adjust your screen brightness to match your surrounding environment.

Have more questions about how the digital world could be affecting your vision and eye health? Schedule an appointment today and share any questions or concerns you have. We are happy to walk through your symptoms and help you get relief.

How Eating Healthy Affects Your Eyes

The foods and vitamins you consume affect your body’s overall health, including your eyes. With a healthy diet and lifestyle, the likelihood of developing some eye diseases and health disorders dramatically decreases. With a few simple steps, your body will thank you later!

Eating Healthy Foods

One of the best things you can do is choose foods rich in antioxidants and vitamins. An easy trick to remember is dark green or brightly colored fruits and vegetables are the go-to foods. Not only will they impact your overall health, but they will help to reduce the chances of developing eye diseases such as dry eyes and cataracts.

Another trick is to look for different versions of your favorite snacks. Instead of foods that are high in sugar or made from white flour, look for sugar-free foods and whole-grain alternatives. Healthy fats such as salmon and nuts are high in omega-3, which helps with your eye health.

Hydration

Water is one of the best drinks that you can choose, so drink plenty of it! Stay away from sugary drinks because proper hydration helps to reduce dry eye symptoms.

Nutrients

Nutrients are essential to your overall health. If you find yourself not getting the amounts needed daily, look into taking supplements to ensure you receive the proper amount. The following nutrients can help reduce your risk for many eye related issues!

  • Vitamin A: night blindness and dry eyes
  • Omega-3: macular degeneration and dry eyes
  • Vitamin C: cataracts and macular degeneration
  • Vitamin D: macular degeneration
  • Zinc: night blindness
  • Vitamin E: advanced macular degeneration

Aging Eyes

Your eyes will change as you age, so it’s essential to take all factors into consideration on how to keep your eyes healthy. One of the most important things is to protect your eyes from the sun’s ultraviolet rays. By wearing sunglasses with built-in UV protection, you can help prevent your eyes from developing cataracts and macular degeneration.

Eating lean beef in moderation can also boost your eye health. Beef contains zinc, which helps your body absorb vitamins and may play a role in reducing the risk of advanced age-related macular degeneration.

Another habit you should start is leaving the cigarettes behind. Not only is smoking harmful to your overall health, but it increases the chances of developing eye diseases.

Finally, one of the easiest things you can do is schedule an annual eye exam to detect any eye diseases as early as possible. Many eye conditions start without symptoms, so it’s crucial to have a professional take a look. Call us today to learn more!